Looking For Loved One

Helping you explore new possibilities for the most important people in your life.

Beginning Your Research

Having the Conversation

Finding the Right Residence

Planning Your Move

Is It the Right Time?

Retirement living has many advantages over a traditional living situation, but the idea of moving a loved one into a new community can be intimidating. Researching whether or not retirement living is right for your family is an important first step, and will help bring peace of mind as you navigate this new stage of life. When looking for the perfect place, be sure to consider your loved one’s needs, interests, and tastes, rather than your own. Take your time exploring a variety of options, and read the fine print to ensure your loved one will be enjoying a great quality of life and attentive care.

Finding the Right Fit

It is a good idea to visit the facilities you are interested in. Call ahead to make an appointment to have a tour. During the tour view the living spaces, kitchens and common rooms. Take advantage of a complimentary meal at the facility. Speak to a current resident about their experience. Keep an eye out for the way staff members interact with residents. Ask for copies of newsletters. Inquire about nearby churches, hospitals, shops and parks. See what type of transportation services are available.

Be Compassionate and Empathetic

Once you’ve recognized that your loved one may benefit from extra support, you may be intimidated to start the conversation with them out of fear of their response. This is normal and so here are some tips we suggest for opening up the discussion:

  • Keep your first conversation light; gain an initial sense of your loved one’s reaction. Yes, presenting research, recommendations and options is essential but this can be done at a later date. It is beneficial to gradually introduce the idea in conversation.
  • As you have more conversations make sure you set aside plenty of time for the discussions surrounding it. You may wish to include other family members to make your loved one feel safer during this time but be careful not to overwhelm them.
  • Be sure to remain respectful of him or her and to confirm that they have a part in the decision-making progress. Stress that their opinion matters; be sure to keep the conversation and decision-making inclusive for everyone. Keep in mind how you would feel if you discovered your family was making decisions about your future without allowing you to have a say!
  • Seniors may have a number of questions or concerns about moving which you should be prepared to address. In fact, you should encourage your loved one to ask questions. You do not want to make your loved one feel as though you have already determined an outcome for them.
  • Ask your own opened-ended questions to allow your loved one to explain their feelings and desires for the future. Remember, open communication is key!

You can expect a certain level of reservations from your loved one, including anxiety about moving and giving up their home, fear of giving away control and not knowing any familiar faces if they were to move. To address these fears, assure your loved one that senior living communities should offer a range of activities to acclimate new residents, senior social events to promote friendships and that today’s senior homes promote independent-living amongst residents.

Another aspect to consider is that financial concerns may pose a problem. Assure your loved one that they will have your support in seeking clarity and transparency on the financial savings and costs as they age. 

Andrews Senior Care Comprehensive Tour Checklist

To find the right residence for you, we have compiled this comprehensive list of things you should consider.

  • Residence Name:
  • Residence Contact Information:
  • Is the location close enough for my family and friends to visit?
  • Is the residence easy to get to?
  • Is the facility maintained well, well-landscaped and homelike?
  • Is there adequate parking for residents and guests?
  • When can guests visit and when can’t they? Are pets allowed?
  • Does the residence have the proper Community Care License required to operate a facility on Prince Edward Island?
  • Is the noise level appropriate? Is it as busy or as quiet as you would like?
  • Do the residents seem well cared for?
  • Is there adequate security in place?
  • Are residents happy, active and friendly towards you?
  • Is there a residents’ council?
  • Do caregivers seem professional, well-informed, and friendly?
  • Do caregivers seem respectful and courteous?
  • What is the staff/resident ratio?
  • What is the laundry and housekeeping schedule?
  • Is there transportation provided?
  • What activity and educational programs can you join?
  • What kinds of entertainment are provided at the facility?
  • What amenities are at the facility? (ie. hair salon, cafe)
  • What religious services take place at the facility?
  • Are special dietary needs catered to? (ie. diabetic, vegetarian?)
  • Are meals made from scratch?
  • Does the food arrive hot and flavourful?
  • Are there special dinners and mealtime events for special occasions?
  • Are there fruit and vegetables at every meal?
  • Is the dining area open to the public?
  • Are services like physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy available? Is there a cost?
  • Is there a registered nurse on 24/7?
  • Is there a house doctor?
  • What is the procedure if I have a medical emergency?
  • Are the hallways wide and well-lit? Is there an elevator?
  • Are private washrooms available?
  • What types of rooms are available?
  • Does the facility replace items that are lost or stolen?
  • Is there an emergency communication system is in place?

Downsizing

Once you find out when you’re loved one can settle into their new residence, begin forming a plan on how to make moving day as efficient as possible. Retirement communities often have less space than your loved one’s previous home, so be sure to consider what should move to the new residence and what needs to be stored elsewhere. This can be a fun opportunity for you and your loved one to reflect on memories, and allow them to make decisions about what should be packed and what should be given away well before the day of the move.

Make it a Home

One of the best gifts you can give during the moving process is making sure your loved one feels content in their new home. Take the time to put out family pictures, make up the bed, and unpack favorite books, movies, etc. Share your enthusiasm for their new space, explore the building, and make sure they feel comfortable with the staff. Another way to ease the anxiety of moving is to plan a visit within the first week or so after the move takes place. This is a great opportunity to deliver any forgotten items, and make sure the transition is going smoothly.

Beginning Your Research

Is It the Right Time?
Retirement living has many advantages over a traditional living situation, but the idea of moving a loved one into a new community can be intimidating. Researching whether or not retirement living is right for your family is an important first step, and will help bring peace of mind as you navigate this new stage of life. When looking for the perfect place, be sure to consider your loved one’s needs, interests, and tastes, rather than your own. Take your time exploring a variety of options, and read the fine print to ensure your loved one will be enjoying a great quality of life and attentive care.

Finding the Right Fit
It is a good idea to visit the facilities you are interested in. Call ahead to make an appointment to have a tour. During the tour view the living spaces, kitchens and common rooms. Take advantage of a complimentary meal at the facility. Speak to a current resident about their experience. Keep an eye out for the way staff members interact with residents. Ask for copies of newsletters. Inquire about nearby churches, hospitals, shops and parks. See what type of transportation services are available.

Having the Conversation

Be Compassionate and Empathetic

Once you’ve recognized that your loved one may benefit from extra support, you may be intimidated to start the conversation with them out of fear of their response. This is normal and so here are some tips we suggest for opening up the discussion:

  • Keep your first conversation light; gain an initial sense of your loved one’s reaction. Yes, presenting research, recommendations and options is essential but this can be done at a later date. It is beneficial to gradually introduce the idea in conversation.
  • As you have more conversations make sure you set aside plenty of time for the discussions surrounding it. You may wish to include other family members to make your loved one feel safer during this time but be careful not to overwhelm them.
  • Be sure to remain respectful of him or her and to confirm that they have a part in the decision-making progress. Stress that their opinion matters; be sure to keep the conversation and decision-making inclusive for everyone. Keep in mind how you would feel if you discovered your family was making decisions about your future without allowing you to have a say!
  • Seniors may have a number of questions or concerns about moving which you should be prepared to address. In fact, you should encourage your loved one to ask questions. You do not want to make your loved one feel as though you have already determined an outcome for them.
  • Ask your own opened-ended questions to allow your loved one to explain their feelings and desires for the future. Remember, open communication is key!

You can expect a certain level of reservations from your loved one, including anxiety about moving and giving up their home, fear of giving away control and not knowing any familiar faces if they were to move. To address these fears, assure your loved one that senior living communities should offer a range of activities to acclimate new residents, senior social events to promote friendships and that today’s senior homes promote independent-living amongst residents.

Another aspect to consider is that financial concerns may pose a problem. Assure your loved one that they will have your support in seeking clarity and transparency on the financial savings and costs as they age.

Finding the Right Residence

Andrews Senior Care Comprehensive Tour Checklist

To find the right residence for you, we have compiled this comprehensive list of things you should consider.

  • Residence Name:
  • Residence Contact Information:
  • Is the location close enough for my family and friends to visit?
  • Is the residence easy to get to?
  • Is the facility maintained well, well-landscaped and homelike?
  • Is there adequate parking for residents and guests?
  • When can guests visit and when can’t they? Are pets allowed?
  • Does the residence have the proper Community Care License required to operate a facility on Prince Edward Island?
  • Is the noise level appropriate? Is it as busy or as quiet as you would like?
  • Do the residents seem well cared for?
  • Is there adequate security in place?
  • Are residents happy, active and friendly towards you?
  • Is there a residents’ council?
  • Do caregivers seem professional, well-informed, and friendly?
  • Do caregivers seem respectful and courteous?
  • What is the staff/resident ratio?
  • What is the laundry and housekeeping schedule?
  • Is there transportation provided?
  • What activity and educational programs can you join?
  • What kinds of entertainment are provided at the facility?
  • What amenities are at the facility? (ie. hair salon, cafe)
  • What religious services take place at the facility?
  • Are special dietary needs catered to? (ie. diabetic, vegetarian?)
  • Are meals made from scratch?
  • Does the food arrive hot and flavourful?
  • Are there special dinners and mealtime events for special occasions?
  • Are there fruit and vegetables at every meal?
  • Is the dining area open to the public?
  • Are services like physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy available? Is there a cost?
  • Is there a registered nurse on 24/7?
  • Is there a house doctor?
  • What is the procedure if I have a medical emergency?
  • Are the hallways wide and well-lit? Is there an elevator?
  • Are private washrooms available?
  • What types of rooms are available?
  • Does the facility replace items that are lost or stolen?
  • Is there an emergency communication system is in place?
Planning Your Move

Downsizing:
Once you find out when you’re loved one can settle into their new residence, begin making a plan on how to make moving day as efficient as possible. Retirement communities often have less space than your loved one’s previous home, so be sure to consider what should move to the new residence and what needs to be stored elsewhere. This can be a fun opportunity for you and your loved one to reflect on memories, and allow them to make decisions about what should be packed and what should be given away well before the day of the move.

Make it a Home
One of the best gifts you can give during the moving process is making sure your loved one feels content in their new home. Take the time to put out family pictures, make up the bed, and unpack favorite books, movies, etc. Share your enthusiasm for their new space, explore the building, and make sure they feel comfortable with the staff. Another way to ease the anxiety of moving is to plan a visit within the first week or so after the move takes place. This is a great opportunity to deliver any forgotten items, and make sure the transition is going smoothly.

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Free eBook: 21 Warning Signs That Your Parent Needs Help

How do you know when it’s time to discuss long-term, supervised care with a loved one? With this eBook you will discover 21 common warning signs that indicate it may be time to consider a plan for additional care options. Be informed so that you can make the best decision together with your aging parent.